iHerp Answers! mail us Problem? search Search       Create an Account, It's Free!
  Home > iHerp Answers > Ball Python issues: Stuck eye caps, questionable heat pits... Advice??
Q: Ball Python issues: Stuck eye caps, questionable heat pits... Advice??
Posted By:

Floof

In Relation To:

Hobbs [BP-99-F1]
I was given Hobbs, a 10 year old Ball Python, this last Sunday. He has retained eye caps and feeding problems (only refusal due to temps, feeds f/t otherwise). His mouth and heat pit health is questionable, though he isn't showing any signs of RI or mouth rot.

I would like your guys' opinions concerning the eye caps and heat pits.

First of all, I don't know how to possibly remove the eye caps, without going to the vet (and paying ungodly amounts of money--free animals are never free! Lol!). He's had one warm water soak with a damp towel, and one "pillowcase soak" (left in a damp pillowcase, again with a damp towel, for half an hour, as directed by the nifty "What's Wrong With My Snake?" book), and the eye caps don't want to come off... I've been doing no more than rubbing the eye gently with the damp towel, though, to prevent damage to the eye. Any other ideas?

Also, his heat pits seem oddly red and inflamed... Of course, I've never had a python, and, therefore, never a snake with heat pits, so I don't know if they're normally bright pink or if they're supposed to be pale! To someone with more python experience, how do they look?

So, basically:
How can I remove these stuck eye caps?
Are his heat pits infected, or otherwise unhealthy?

The attached picture displays both the worse of the two eyes and his heat pits in true color.

Thanks in advance for any input!

Attached Photos:


Points: 150
Topics: General Health , Eyes
Tags: Eyecaps, Heat, Infection, Pits, Python, Retained, Shed
Species: Pythons > Pythons > Python regius
Administrative: Show/Hide

Accepted Answer 6/10/2009 2:53:16 AM

cheryl Todd
As far as his eye caps go, wait until his next shed before getting overly concerned. Make sure he has enough humidity to shed a complete shed. With my ball pythons that are in tanks, I place wet paper towels in a tupperware bowl with a lid and cut a hole big enough for my snakes to get into them. I place that either on top of thew heat mat or under the light to create a humidity box. Because your humidity conditions in your home may be lower than what he needs to do a complete shed, the humidity box gives him a warm place to soak (as opposed to a cool water bowl). Trying to remove them when he's not in shed could prove to be difficult if you have never done it before. Once he starts shedding, you can try to help by assisting him with that area while you have some of the shed around that area to use as leverage. He is also going to become more stressed if you try too hard right now (give him some time to learn to trust you). His heat pits appear normal to me. If they were pale, or had discharge, I would be highly concerned.
 
Assisted Answer 6/10/2009 3:00:22 AM

Katie M
Just an FYI - never put a snake in a wet pillowcase - unfortunately, once the water has been absorbed by the material, it makes it nearly impossible if not impossible for air to move through the fabric, and your snake can suffocate.  I just helped Demerera through a rough shed tonight by filling a sterilite tub about 1.5 inches deep with lukewarm to warm water, and soaked her for 45 minutes, VOILA!! She's all shed and happy as a clam. 
 
Member Comment 6/10/2009 3:00:24 AM

Katie M
Just an FYI - never put a snake in a wet pillowcase - unfortunately, once the water has been absorbed by the material, it makes it nearly impossible if not impossible for air to move through the fabric, and your snake can suffocate.  I just helped Demerera through a rough shed tonight by filling a sterilite tub about 1.5 inches deep with lukewarm to warm water, and soaked her for 45 minutes, VOILA!! She's all shed and happy as a clam. 
 
Member Comment 6/10/2009 4:56:02 AM

critterking1987

for stuck eye caps i use scotch tape just take a piece and gently place it on the eye and pull it off slowly it should lift the eyecaps enough that you can pull it off i forgot to say soak the snake first hope this helps

 
Assisted Answer 6/10/2009 7:38:43 AM

vonnick52
I would let the animal shed the eye cap off on its own....some soaks and such won't hurt him or her, but I wouldn't resort to trying to manually removing the eyecap unless they don't come off with the next shed.  Soak 'em every 3 days or so and don't bother trying to feed for a few weeks....he might not eat until he sheds that eye cap off anyways.

The heat pits look ok to me.

 
Assisted Answer 6/10/2009 11:02:56 AM

Morticias Mojo
I agree with the others on bumping up the humidity during his next shed and seeing if they come off then.  If you have him in a tank and need a bit more humidity in there, I can a regular towel, get it damp and place it over most of the top of the screen.  Others have used tin foil (just not touching the lamps) and they say that helps retain the humidity.  Just make sure the towel isn't dripping.  I will let Mojo soak in the tub (making sure the tub has been cleaned first) in about an inch of slightly above lukewarm water.  With Hobbs being larger you can add more water, as long as it isn't over his head.  There is another suggestion for removing the eye caps, but I personally won't use that until I'm properly shown. (the wet q-tip method).

I also agree that the heat pits look fine. 
 
Author Comment 6/10/2009 11:36:25 AM

Floof
Thanks, everyone. I was worried about letting the eyecaps go because I'm not sure when his next shed will be, but I'll just give him a moist hide and leave him alone, then. I'm also very happy to hear that his heat pits look healthy. =)
You are not logged in. If you would like to participate (it's free!), you must log in, or Become a Member!
  

Member Login
 
 
Forgot My Password
Copyright ©2008, All Rights Reserved. iHerp, LLC | Terms of Use 11/30/2021 10:07:09 AM | 0.0.0.0